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FrogBlog — Fire Enamels

Why we LOVE Quartz Tubing!

Art Glass Fire Enamels Fuse Glass Glass Glass Art Glass Design Glass Design Ideas Kilns Paragon CS-26 Paragon Kilns Quartz enclosed tubes Quartz Tubing

Why we LOVE Quartz Tubing!

Paragon CS-26 Whether it's offered as standard or an upgrade, we always love kilns that have quart tubing! Quart tubing provides a cleaner kiln interior and magnifies the heat to the glass. They also support and protect the elements from contamination with foreign materials that could shorten the element life. In addition, quartz tubes protect the glass from any falling debris from exposed elements. If you fire enamels, the metal oxides can cake onto the elements causing them to sag, and drop colored debris... yuk! Gail has two kilns at her studio with quartz enclosed tubes and never has to worry that anything...

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Think your glass art can handle a little more heat?

Color Enamels Fire Enamels Fuse Glass Fuse Master Enamels Fusing Glass Kilns

Think your glass art can handle a little more heat?

Last week, we talked about colors and how they relate to emotion... now, let's look at an easy way to add color to your glass! Fuse Master Easy Fire High-Temperature Enamels are an exciting collection of bright colors that are easy to fire and provide an alternative to traditional sheet glass. As they don't require special venting to get rich strong colors, you can just pop them in the kiln and go! Easy Fire Enamels are a very finely ground powder... it's actually 300 mesh which is much finer than powdered frit and most other enamels. It can easily be...

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Venting Your Kiln; Why & When?

Buy Kiln Ceramic Kiln Color line paints Devitrification Enameling Evenheat Kiln - Studio Pro 17 Fire Enamels Firing Fuse Glass Glass crash cooling Glass Fusing Glass Fusing Kiln Glass Painting Kiln Academy Kiln Plugs Kiln Venting Olympic Quatro 16 Orton VentMaster Venting Venting your Kiln VentM VentMaster

Venting Your Kiln; Why & When?

When I first started fusing glass in 2001, the subject of venting your kiln was really not much of a discussion. Everyone vented the kiln to cool it. The kiln manufacturers would wince when the topic came up. They hated it, but we all thought that was what we were supposed to do.  In glass fusing we called it "crashing" or crash cooling. We basically opened the kiln at 1470F (full fusing temperature) and then let cool air into the kiln until the thermocouple reading was below 1200F. This might have to be done a few times to account for...

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